here

elsewhere

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
Fougasse aux grattelons. One of the wondrous things our favorite local bakery makes. Edited: I wrote lardons before but it’s actually grattelons, which are like pork crackling bits.) . . . #bread #france #frenchfood #livinginfrance #vaucluse

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
Strawberry season has started here in Provence. These Gariguettes are monsters

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
I’m using a sport weight yarn for the crochet, but compared to the lace thread I use for tatting it feels uuuuuuuuuuge. And the lace is #10 thread, the thickest kind I use! . . . #tattinglace #tatting #crochet

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
Inside my Easter egg. . . . #easter #paques #chocolate #easteregg #france #livinginfrance

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
The state of my hair when the seasons change. . . . . #spring #finecurlyhair #selfportrait #adobesketch

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
Back again eith more from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961). This is from the egg section. . The first photo is titled “A bright western style breakfast featuring fried eggs”. Fried eggs (medamayaki) are very popular for breakfast or any meal now, but cereal for breakfast never really caught on in a big way, although you can get the basic types like cornflakes at any supermarket. You certainly don’t see the huge aisles dedicated to cereals you see in American supermarkets though. For a breakfast like this you’ll probably have toast or maybe a small roll rather than the cereal. Love the ‘60s coffee pot! . The next photo shows a selection of wafuu (traditional Japanese) and chuuka (Chinese) egg dishes. The Japanese ones all seem to be meant to be served cold. . The last picture, a graphic showing different egg sizes and how much they weigh, is my favorite - so clear and easy to understand!

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
«Comment faire des Makis maison» - how to make Makis at home. Yes it’s about makizushi (sushi rolls), which are called makis here, but it made me laugh anyway. «Pour environ 25 Makis il vous fait....» quoth the spousal unit, “oh no, the mind boggles”

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
More from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961.). . Two features in the Cooking Encyclopedia that you don’t see in more recent cookbooks. One is a 2-page spread about hunting, how to choose the game (mainly birds) that taste good, and how to deal with the game you’ve shot. The birds listed on the 2nd page include partridge, pheasant, quail, geese, sparrow, wood pigeon and thrush. In the past few years (as of 2018) hunting has made a bit of a comeback in Japan, but game is called “jibie” (from the French word for game, “gibier”). These pages are a reminder that hunting has actually been around for a long time in Japan. . The third image is of the header of the “other meats” section. The meats listed are sheep (lamb or mutton), rabbit, boar, horse and whale. Rabbit and whale are rarely eaten these these days, and you never see recipes for them in general cookbooks like this. Lamb is getting a bit more popular due to imports from New Zealand and Australia.

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
I only got to try Le Grand Veggie, McDonald’s France’s first ever vegetarian burger, once. It was introduced in October but is already off the menu. It was okay. Apparently it was a calorie bomb though, weighing in at 763 kcal vs. 503 kcal for a Big Mac. But just the fact that McDo France introduced a veggie burger option was an event. I did however, like the design of Le Grand Veggie’s box. . (Note:McDonald’s Switzerland has had veggie options for years. European McDo’s don’t all have the same menus. You can have fun trying out the “regional McDo specialities”.

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
More from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961.) This photo has the caption “[Eat] yoshoku casually with chopsticks”. The equivalent in the west would be saying “eat Asian food casually with a knife and fork”. Nowadays forks and knives are used all the time in Japan, but that wouldn’t have been the case back then. (These days “yoshoku” is still often eaten with chopsticks, especially at home.) Note the use of very Japanese looking dinnerware for everything. . The recipes featured are interesting, since none of them are eaten regularly anymore except for the consommé. Going clockwise from top left, there’s breaded fried boiled beef, tomato salad with mousseline sauce, rabbit and vegetable pot pie (made in a donabe!), and consommé (described as “sumashi soup”). Rabbit is rarely eaten in Japan now. The recipe for the salad uses a kind of mushroom called iwatake that is so expensive now that it’s mostly only used in traditional medicine (it grows on cliff sides and such and is very difficult to gather). The “mousseline sauce” has mirin in it, which is surely a Japanese touch.

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
More from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961.) These two photos show “chuuka” or Chinese dishes. It’s important to remember that in 1961 Chinese cuisine was almost as exotic to most Japanese home cooks as western/European cuisine was.The book has a lot more color plates of “yoshoku” (European cuisine) and “chuuka” (Chinese cuisine) than familiar “washoku” (Japanese cuisine), except for the fancy kind served to guests.

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
More from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961.) This is a two page spread about steak, which would have been very exotic to most Japanese people in 1961. . . Big steaks or any big slab o’ beef have been associated with the US for a long time in Japan. I remember my father mentioning once that he’d bever seen a T-bone steak until his company sent him to the US for a business trip in the mid-1960s, and how he was bowled over by how huge it was. Much later on in the late ‘80s-early ‘90s visitors from Japan (we were living in NY then) always wanted to go to a steak house at least once. I don’t think that’s as much the case now though, since you can get fairly inexpensive steak in Japan now too at various chain restaurants. . The meat sections show the names for the degrees of doneness. From top to bottom: well done, medium, medium rare and rare. “Well done” still looks pretty rare to me... and I suspect the pics for ”medium rare” and “rare” may have been reversed....

makiwi

Instagram - Fri, 2018-04-20 05:36
More from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961.) This is a 2 page spread showing a “Christmas party at home”. While the barbecue scene was very American, this is very European/French. The menu consists of a “quiche au fromage” (helpfully (?) explained as an “Alsatian cheese pie”; “poulet rôti” (“steam-roasted young chicken”); “dropped fried potatoes” (little croquettes); “spaghetti Sauce Kyarii” (I had no idea what “Sauce Kyarii” was supposed to be, but from the recipe it’s a curry flavored sauce); “salade chicorée”; for dessert “Mont Blanc” (“a chestnut dessert”) and coffee. This would have been the height of sophistication in 1961. Notice how while the rest of the dinnerware is very European, they’re using a donabe for the spaghetti! . Mont Blanc, a chestnut cream and whipped cream pastry, is still one of the most popular sweets in Japan-so popular that there are cheaper variations using sweet potato cream and so on.

makiwi

Instagram - Tue, 2018-04-03 15:51
I’m using a sport weight yarn for the crochet, but compared to the lace thread I use for tatting it feels uuuuuuuuuuge. And the lace is #10 thread, the thickest kind I use! . . . #tattinglace #tatting #crochet

makiwi

Instagram - Sun, 2018-04-01 11:33
Inside my Easter egg. . . . #easter #paques #chocolate #easteregg #france #livinginfrance

makiwi

Instagram - Thu, 2018-03-29 00:32
The state of my hair when the seasons change. . . . . #spring #finecurlyhair #selfportrait #adobesketch

makiwi

Instagram - Sat, 2018-02-24 15:48
Back again eith more from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961). This is from the egg section. . The first photo is titled “A bright western style breakfast featuring fried eggs”. Fried eggs (medamayaki) are very popular for breakfast or any meal now, but cereal for breakfast never really caught on in a big way, although you can get the basic types like cornflakes at any supermarket. You certainly don’t see the huge aisles dedicated to cereals you see in American supermarkets though. For a breakfast like this you’ll probably have toast or maybe a small roll rather than the cereal. Love the ‘60s coffee pot! . The next photo shows a selection of wafuu (traditional Japanese) and chuuka (Chinese) egg dishes. The Japanese ones all seem to be meant to be served cold. . The last picture, a graphic showing different egg sizes and how much they weigh, is my favorite - so clear and easy to understand!

makiwi

Instagram - Wed, 2018-02-21 16:23
«Comment faire des Makis maison» - how to make Makis at home. Yes it’s about makizushi (sushi rolls), which are called makis here, but it made me laugh anyway. «Pour environ 25 Makis il vous fait....» quoth the spousal unit, “oh no, the mind boggles”

makiwi

Instagram - Sat, 2018-02-17 17:55
More from the Cooking Encyclopedia (Ryori Hyakka, published by Shufunotomo in Tokyo, 1961.). . Two features in the Cooking Encyclopedia that you don’t see in more recent cookbooks. One is a 2-page spread about hunting, how to choose the game (mainly birds) that taste good, and how to deal with the game you’ve shot. The birds listed on the 2nd page include partridge, pheasant, quail, geese, sparrow, wood pigeon and thrush. In the past few years (as of 2018) hunting has made a bit of a comeback in Japan, but game is called “jibie” (from the French word for game, “gibier”). These pages are a reminder that hunting has actually been around for a long time in Japan. . The third image is of the header of the “other meats” section. The meats listed are sheep (lamb or mutton), rabbit, boar, horse and whale. Rabbit and whale are rarely eaten these these days, and you never see recipes for them in general cookbooks like this. Lamb is getting a bit more popular due to imports from New Zealand and Australia.

makiwi

Instagram - Sat, 2018-02-17 15:10
I only got to try Le Grand Veggie, McDonald’s France’s first ever vegetarian burger, once. It was introduced in October but is already off the menu. It was okay. Apparently it was a calorie bomb though, weighing in at 763 kcal vs. 503 kcal for a Big Mac. But just the fact that McDo France introduced a veggie burger option was an event. I did however, like the design of Le Grand Veggie’s box. . (Note:McDonald’s Switzerland has had veggie options for years. European McDo’s don’t all have the same menus. You can have fun trying out the “regional McDo specialities”.

some of my flickr photos